COVID-19 Updates: We are keeping our staff, clients and their family members safe and healthy. Our headquarters offices are closed, however we are 100% operational, available 24/7 over email and phone and we continue to work remotely for all of our current and future claims. More FAQs

Home   >   Questions & answers  >  How many firefighters get cancer due to AFFF?

How many firefighters get cancer due to AFFF?

Approximately 20% of the firefighters who are regularly exposed to AFFF come to struggle with a form of cancer, whether their exposure occurred on the job or while serving in the military.

answered by Gregory A. Cade

There are over 1.1 million volunteer and career firefighters throughout the country, out of which approximately 20% develop cancer as a result of AFFF exposure

Aqueous film-forming foam, commonly know as AFFF, has been used by firefighters both during training and on the job since 1970, as it is very effective in extinguishing petroleum and jet fuel fires. However, AFFF contains two groups of toxic chemicals, namely PFOS and PFOA. Prolonged exposure to PFOS and PFOA can lead to terrible diseases over the years, such as leukemia, bladder cancer, lymphoma, pancreatic cancer, and kidney cancer. It is estimated that 20% of firefighters come to struggle with a disease as a result of frequent exposure to AFFF. Nevertheless, it is important to know that it takes several years of exposure for a firefighter to develop a form of cancer. If you are a firefighter who developed a disease as a consequence of occupational exposure to AFFF, you have the legal right to seek compensation from the liable company. A lawyer with vast experience in toxic exposure cases will be able to help you file a lawsuit against the responsible company and if you were exposed in the military, a claim with the VA for disability compensation as well.

Other related questions

While there are currently no regulations concerning exposure to PFOS and PFOA from AFFF, the Environmental Protection Agency is working to remediate the issue, as it compiled a list of contaminants which includes PFOS and PFOA.

Read more

Disability compensation for exposure to AFFF is available only for firefighters who served in the military. However, civilian firefighters can also recover compensation by filing a lawsuit against the company which manufactured the product.

Read more

Although the PFOS and PFOA in AFFF can be harmful to the human body in any amount, exposure needs to occur for several years for a person to develop cancer.

Read more

Factors affecting compensation depend on the severity and circumstances of the exposure. Diagnosis of the condition associated with AFFF exposure is one of the primary factors used to start the case.

Read more

Aqueous film-forming foam, commonly known as AFFF, has been used since 1970 to extinguish class B fires. Because it contains PFOS and PFOA, two groups of carcinogenic chemicals, exposure can lead to serious diseases over the years.

Read more

The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health notes that at least 5-8% of cancers throughout the world are attributable to the prolonged exposure to carcinogens in the work environment.

Read more

AFFF contains two groups of toxic chemicals, namely PFOS and PFOA, exposure to which can result in terrible diseases such as kidney cancer, bladder cancer, and pancreatic cancer.

Read more

Asbestos exposure can lead to the development of multiple cancers, the most common being lung cancer.

Read more

While exposure to the PFOS and PFOA in AFFF is never safe, firefighters and military personnel who regularly use it are at the highest risk of developing a related disease, such as bladder cancer.

Read more

See more questions