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How Widespread Is Asbestos in the Workplace Nowadays?

Many people, knowing the dangers of asbestos exposure, believe that the U.S. and other developed countries have banned the use of asbestos. Unfortunately, that is not entirely true.

answered by Michael Bartlett

Asbestos exposure is still common in some lines of work

According to a study conducted by the American Thoracic Society, approximately 1.3 million U.S. workers - primarily in the construction industry - are regularly exposed to asbestos on the job. Products containing asbestos continue to be manufactured and sold throughout the country today and thousands of buildings which have asbestos-containing materials are still standing.

At the moment, most asbestos in the U.S. comes from import and the most common products in which this carcinogenic mineral lurks nowadays include:

Even after decades of health concerns over the increase in asbestos-related diseases, exposure is still common in some occupational fields. Workers involved in refurbishment or maintenance could still be at risk, and the list also includes the following occupational groups:

  • demolition workers
  • heating and ventilation engineers
  • plumbers
  • carpenters
  • painters
  • decorators
  • roofing contractors
  • computer installers
  • electricians
  • cable layers
  • architects
  • telecommunications engineers

However, it is important to bear in mind that occupational asbestos exposure is significantly less likely to result in a life-threatening disease today, as the majority of U.S. employers comply with the strict safety regulations established by EPA and OSHA, which are meant to minimize the health hazard.

If your employment history or your current job involves working with significant amounts of asbestos and you have questions about different legal aspects of asbestos exposure, do not hesitate to contact Environmental Litigation Group, P.C. Our professional team will be happy to help you with any of your questions. For additional information, please contact us at 205.328.9200.

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